Thursday, July 9, 2020

Chinky-Pox Paranoia

We're living in crazy times, that's for sure. Unemployment rates are 14.7% to 20% depending on who you believe (Unemployment in 2019 was 4.8%). Bars are closed again. Restaurants can only operate at 50% capacity. No organized 4th of July fireworks, but that night San Angelo sounded like we were in a war zone. Mandatory facemask edicts. Social distancing. Here in town most fast food restaurants have kept their dining rooms closed, they are now drive thru only. McDonalds no longer serves breakfast items all day long (the horror!). But EJ and I haven't gotten all paranoid over the virus just like many other rational folks. We no longer trust anything the media says and it is sad that we have to fact check everything they produce. So many don’t bother to check and just believe whatever news(lies) they are fed. We adapt to the degree we are forced to and continue on with our lives.

As long time readers know, EJ and I have temporarily relocated to San Angelo, Texas as this is where my father lives. His health has deteriorated and he is now under the care of hospice. We are staying here for several reasons.1) we hope to be able to once again be with Dad on a daily basis before he leaves this world; 2) we are in the process of wrapping up his affairs.

March 16 was the last day I was able to spend with him. Since he went into the hospital on December 17, 2019 I had spent every day with him. We talked, he slept, I kept occupied on the laptop and I handled the small stuff like getting him food or water and making sure he was comfortable. Not being able to visit with him is an emotional challenge particularly knowing he may pass away before we are allowed to be with him again. So we continue to wait and hope the Chinky-Pox scare ends before he dies.

Dad has always had a big heart and has always helped his friends if they were in a tight spot. He would loan money, buy furniture from someone that needed money even though he didn’t need another thing for his apartment. He would give friends a ride to the doctor or to go shopping. He would even go shopping for them if they couldn’t get out. In the last few years he hired a friend to drive him. Dad paid him every week whether he needed him or not. Even as recently as a couple of weeks ago he wanted to know if “Joe” was still being taken care of. That’s Dad’s big heart. But because he had a hard time saying no to people, Dad ended up with an apartment full of excess “Stuff”.

Unedited view of Dad's apartment

EJ has been working diligently over the last few months to sell odds and ends. Finally, about a month ago I finally accepted the fact that Dad was never going to be able to return to his apartment. It was time to let everything go. I guess I had a glimmer of hope that he might somehow recover and things would return to some level of normalcy. I know that was a pipe dream, but I could still hope. Since then EJ has gone into high gear and has been advertising and selling stuff right and left. Dressers, night stands, lamps, book cases, tables, computers, file cabinets, a water cooler, refrigerator, printers, tools, a huge TV and more. Now we are down to nick-knacks, clothes and a queen sized bed. She has a big sale planned for the remaining items as we are shooting for vacating Dad’s apartment by the end of July.

But now for some RV stuff. We have recently had some major hail storms. Hail 2 to 2.5 inches in diameter fell for about 30 minutes on May 21, 2020.

Hail size San AngeloHail damage

Fortunately we were at the RV and heard the early stages of the storm. I managed to get the Explorer under a shelter here at the Concho Pearl RV Estates and left EJ and the cats in Miss Mosey. Boy did I hear about that later on. EJ was not a happy camper after all the noise and anxiety produced by the storm. Gabby was not happy either. She disappeared during the storm. How she manages to find hiding places in the RV that we can’t find is a mystery. The next day I checked the roof of Miss Mosey and found no damage. But, the Explorer did end up with a few minor dings you can see if you really look for them. Meh! I’ve given up on having a perfect car. It is what it is!

However, Miss Mosey did not escape completely damage free. Our slide toppers are of indeterminate age. They could be as old as 9 years, or not. We think the previous owners told us they had been replaced once. Nonetheless, since the previous owners full timed in her and we are too, the toppers have been exposed to the sun for most of their lives. That means lots of sun aging or damage. The hail was just the final straw.

Topper damage

That’s a lot of sunlight coming through the weather proof fabric. So we ordered new toppers from Tough Tops and installed them ourselves. Youtube to the rescue for installation hints. It was so hot, we could only do one a day. The heat just wilted us.

As I mentioned above, Dad still has a car. It is a 2004 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT that he has had since it was new. It was his wish that “Joe”, his driver, end up with it. I met with “Joe” to discuss it and he didn’t want it. Said he couldn’t afford it. Well, alright. I can understand that. Licensing, insurance, maintenance that takes some serious coin. And if you don’t need the car, it could be a real burden.

So I undertook the task of selling the car. To make it really presentable, I replaced a broken windshield and a O2 sensor in the exhaust that was making the check engine light come on. Showed it to a guy that was going to sell it for me and he liked what he saw. I told him I would bring it back after I got it cleaned up. I bet I didn’t get 3 blocks before that stupid car started developing major problems. Only 5 cylinders were firing. So I thought, I can’t sell it like this. I took it to a recommended mechanic. It had a bad brain box. So he replaced it. I drove it a block and it started missing again. I took it back. It’s got a bad brain box he says. I say, find out what is causing it. After 2 days he calls back and says you have a bad fuel injector wiring harness.

2004 Grand Caravan Fuel Rail wiring

Yep, it’s bad all right. There is a lot of missing insulation and it was shorting out. I did some research and turns out this is a fairly common problem on the early 2000’s Caravans. He couldn’t get the part because according to Dodge it is on national backorder. I called several Dodge dealers myself in a hundred mile radius and yep, it’s on backorder. So, EBay is my friend. I found a dealer back east that had one in stock and it’s being shipped to Dad’s apartment. Should be here late next week.

In the mean time, I have spent way too much money trying to get this car in sellable shape when I probably just should have taken it to the junkyard.

And we haven’t just been sitting stationary. We actually moved! All the way from site 25 to site 42. We went from being surrounded by other RVs to actually having shade trees (well as much as Mesquites can provide shade)  and space tor Gabby and Maggie to explore.

Miss Mosey's new spot

Obligatory cat picture follows….

She has no shame

Gabby enjoying the new yard. That is one relaxed kitty!

Saturday, June 6, 2020

And the child becomes the parent

Concho Pearl RV Park January 1 to May 1, 2020

This point in time comes for a lot of folks, I guess. Your parent or parents, go from being a person or persons upon whom you can depend on for being a steadying force in your life to needing to rely on you instead. It’s a sobering thought, at once a feeling of pride for being in a position to provide that support along with guilt for maybe not being able to do even more.

When we cut our trip to Big Bend National Park short to come back to San Angelo, TX because Dad was in the hospital, little did we know that a big change in our lives was happening. As it has turned out so far, December 16, 2019 would be the last day Dad would be living on his own, in his own home.

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When Dad first started feeling out of sorts, his friends in Rio Concho Manor tried to take care of him, giving him various pills and telling him he needed to drink more water. He was admitted to the hospital with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) with edema. I won’t go into all the details but over the next few months he would be in and out of rehab/nursing home facilities and the hospital. Each time with different ailments.

This is our second experience with nursing homes, EJ’s Mom being the first. So this time around wasn’t our first rodeo. As such we had a pretty good idea that the level of help we thought Dad needed and the help he would actually receive would be different. We weren’t wrong. Again, I won’t regal you with the deficiencies between what actually do and what we think they should do. Nursing home management always talk a good game while they are trying to sign you up, but the actual performance always falls way short of their promises. We went into this skeptical and we weren’t surprised.

You always want things to happen instantly because that’s how it happens at  home. You have to go to bathroom, you get and go to the bathroom. In a nursing home when you can’t walk under your own power, you have to ring a bell and hope someone shows up before you pee in your pants. You learn quickly to ring the bell the instant you get the urge. You don’t wait until it’s urgent. Some of this was alleviated by either myself or EJ (or both) being with him 6 to 8 hours every day. This way we could smooth over some of the minor inconveniences of Dad no longer being able to care for himself.

But enough of that. Suffice it to say, a nursing home will never do as good a job as you can do yourself, but they are there 24 x 7 and you are only you.

OK, I lied. I am going to get into some details. When Dad first went into San Angelo Nursing and Rehab (SANR) he really tried to get better. He did his exercises and therapy and was able to move around his room under his own power. But somehow his Lasix dosages got doubled and he became severely dehydrated which meant another trip to the hospital. He was released back to SANR after his hospital stay. He then became weaker and weaker and could no longer do his exercises and therapy. He began to experience severe abdominal pain which became so bad he had to go back to the hospital again.

The abdominal pain turned out to be an unstable vertebrate fracture. Any time he attempted to move he would experience debilitating pain. An operation was suggested then discarded as being too risky and his vertebrate being too fragile. When he was released this time it was to go to New Haven Assisted Living where he would be under Hospice care. He is given Fentanyl every three days to manage the pain and he is now bedridden.

As each day goes by he becomes a little weaker and he spends a lot of time living in the past. We are hearing stories we have never heard before and it fun trying to piece together events to put the story into some perspective. 

One thing we have learned to not do is to correct him as this frustrates him and interrupts the flow of story telling or general conversation. A wrong day or location or person makes no difference in the overall scheme of things. Just letting him talk and tell stories is what is important.

And now with Covid-19 interrupting everyone’s lives it has also limited our ability to visit Dad. An assisted living facility is considered a nursing home which means no visitors are allowed in. We have not been allowed in Dad’s room since March 16, 2020. We can still talk to him by phone and occasionally they will open his window and let us visit with him that way. But lately they have even tried cracking down on that.

And so we begin the painful process of going through Dad’s things and starting to let go. The Manor, the apartment building where he has been living the last 13 years, has an annual “yard” sale that we took advantage of.

The big sale

I have finally accepted that he will never be coming back to his apartment and it’s time to prepare for letting it go. He has collected a lot of stuff over the years. Slowly we’re selling it, trashing it or donating it. We have a ways to go yet. It’s not easy.

Obligatory cat picture follows.

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Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Finding a West Texas Home for Miss Mosey

Since the 24th of November, 2019 we have been in San Angelo and will be for the foreseeable future. Family circumstances are such that our presence is needed to oversee some things that are in the works.

Which brings us to our experiences in finding a place to park Miss Mosey for the duration. Normally for stays here in San Angelo of 2 weeks or less we simply park in the parking lot of Rio Concho Manor (where Frank’s Dad lives) next to the power pole which has 2-30 amp connections. This is great as it only costs $5.00 per day and we can combine the 2-30 amps connections and make a hookup which satisfies our power hungry Miss Mosey. But, and this is a major but, even with extreme tank management and showers in Dad’s apartment, a 2 week stay is the limit for our waste tank capacity. We know we are going to be here for at least 2 months, maybe more, so full hookups are in order.

That began our search for an RV park where we could stay as long as we needed to. We drove out to the San Angelo State Park and spoke with one of the Rangers about extended stays. They told us we could stay for a month, but then we would have to leave for 25 hours and we could stay another month. Well, over and over we examined their website with a fine (really fine) tooth comb and we could not figure out how to make a reservation for any stay long than 2 weeks. So all we had to go on was the word of a young Ranger who may or may not be there when we tried to extend our stay. Hmm. I could see a problem happening here.

So I started visiting the various campgrounds in San Angelo. KOA (no monthly spaces available), Spring Park Marina and RV Park (only 2 sites available crammed in amongst other RVers), Huling Mobile Home Park (kinda seedy), Cactus Lane RV and Mobile Home Park (No vancancies),  Tucked Away RV Park (No vanancies), and we are seeing a pattern here.

Energy Services contracting is going strong in here in West Texas. Wind turbine farms, gas pipelines, solar panel fields, and even road construction. All of these require workers and a bunch of workers live in RVs and need a place to park them. Good for the RV Parks, but bad for us. There are a few more RV Parks in the San Angelo area, but even with our flexible standards, we didn’t want to even consider them. The other thing we discovered, the rates at most of the RV parks were close to the same.

Having discovered that monthly rates amongst the choices didn’t vary much, we contacted the owners of Concho Pearl RV Estates (the name is much fancier than the park, but friendlier owners you will not find) whom we knew from previous stays in their park. They said they were full also, but would call back to see if there was something they could do. Sure enough, later that day, they got in touch with us and said we could come on in. There had been some workers moving out and we could stay as long as we needed to.

As with all the long term RV Parks in San Angelo this one too, is filled with construction and energy workers. Which makes for an experience opposite that of what we are used to. It is quiet during the days and deserted on the weekends. The workers are gone all day long and they go home (where ever that might be) on the weekends. Normally RV Parks are bustling with activities during those times. During the week, after work, there is some socializing, but these guys are tired and dirty. All they want to do is get cleaned up, eat and go to bed.

We are not in this picture, but we are the only motorhome in the park.

Until next time, when we talk more about the family matters keeping us here in San Angelo.

Obligatory cat picture follows:

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Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Big Bend National Park

Rio Grande Village Campground 12-9 to 12-16-2020

We did manage to sneak off from Dad’s for a few days and visit Big Bend National Park. That's the good news. The bad news is we both were under the weather the whole time. I hate it when you go someplace special and you’re not well enough to really enjoy it. Don’t get me wrong, we didn’t sit around and mope about it. We still got out and did stuff, but we didn’t do any long hikes. Just being in Big Bend NP was awesome enough.

We had spent Thanksgiving with Dad getting his paperwork under control and making sure he was ok, health wise. Our plan was to spend 10 days in the park, then mosey back to Dad’s for Christmas. Then in late January end up in Red Bay, AL for some Miss Mosey upgrades and touch ups. That would put us in Orange Park in mid February where we would take care of some needed projects at the home base.

We headed south out of San Angelo on US67 then connected with Interstate 10 ending up at Walmart in Ft. Stockton, TX to replenish our supplies. At our ultimate destination there is only a small camp store (with minimal supplies) near Rio Grande Village where we will be dry camping for 10 days. This is our last chance to stock up for that time period.

As an added bonus, there is a huge gravel lot behind the Ft. Stockton Walmart. We decided to make camp here for the night.

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The next morning we drove down US385 which runs from Ft. Stockton to the Persimmon Gap entrance of Big Bend NP. Along the way we stop to stretch our legs at a rest area we have used before for overnight stays.

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While out walking around, EJ found some artwork left behind by some hardy souled bicyclist no doubt.

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When we arrive at the entrance to Big Bend, the guard station is deserted. Alright, we’ll just stop at the Persimmon Gap visitor center. Oops, can’t to that either. It’s closed. A sign on the door says we need to check in at Panther Junction visitor center.

After showing our reservations to the Ranger at Panther Junction, we continue our journey to Rio Grande Village Campground. But along the way we spy a coyote lurking in the bushes giving us the “stink eye”.(More on the coyote later)

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Once we pass through the tunnel, we are greeted with this view. Oh my! A whole 10 days of scenes like this coming up!

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We get settled into our spot and Gabby has already made herself at home.

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We had a very large campsite and it was level. Plus it was raised, so when they flood the fields to irrigate, it will stay nice and dry. The red arrow marks our spot.

Rio Grande Village Map

A new addition since last time we were here are bear boxes. Folks in soft sided campers and tents make good use of these. The camp hosts were pretty strict about enforcing the rules, which we appreciated. Even I got chastised for letting our old arthritic cat (Maggie) walk around without a leash. I was much more diligent about evading detection after that.

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One day driving around, it looked like the clouds were eating the mountains.

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We made drive up to Chisos Basin, which has the only restaurant and lodge in the park. After we ate lunch, EJ wanted to pay some bills (personal responsibilities never go away) so we got out the laptop and connected to one of the few cell signals in the park. And it was windy and it was cold, but she persevered and accomplished her goal.

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Here you can see the Chisos Basin restaurant up the hill from the visitor center parking lot.

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One day we took a walk along the Rio Grande River headed east from the campground. Along the way ( on the US side ) we were approached by an old cowboy-ish looking Mexican. He wanted us to pay him to sing. We opted to decline since we had already heard him singing as we walked up the trail.

EJ was a little skeptical about my choice of a trail as we walked along the continually shrinking path.

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Another day we drove over to Castolon to see the visitor center and store. It is a 56 mile trip one way from where we are camped. I tell you, this park is huge!. Boy were we surprised when we showed up. When we quizzed the ranger on duty, she told of a fire that had gotten out of control and had burned down the old historic buildings. It appears that across the Rio Grande River, piles of trash were being burned when they shouldn’t have been. It was too windy. The ashes jumped the river and caught the under brush on fire on the US side . Unfortunately it reached Castolon and burnt the store, the ranger station and the old bathrooms.

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Since we had driven as far as Castolon, we went ahead and drove on to Santa Elena Canyon. This time though, the river was high. This meant to get to the Santa Elena trail we would have to wade through mud and water if we wanted to hike it. We decided maybe next time.

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On the way back to Miss Mosey that evening, we spotted the coyote again. We had seen him almost every time we drove along this part of the road. This time though, as we slowed down to take pictures he (or she) ran out to snap at our tires. Guess he (or she) felt pretty strongly about guarding this section of the road.

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One day that we were feeling particularly wimpy, (we had been battling colds all week) we took a short hike on the nature loop close to where we were camped. We didn’t realize we would have to cross a swamp as part of the hike.

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Fortunately they had thought to built a bridge over it.

Along the way we also encounter an entrepreneur’s offering along the trail. Hiking sticks, beer can coozies, and wire trinkets are for sale. Along with a message that the proceeds go to the education of the children across the border. Whether or not they do go to the children, it tugs at the old heart strings.

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At the highest point of the nature loop, you can see Boquillas in the distance. (look for tiny blue buildings) That is the only Mexican town near Big Bend NP. There is even an official border crossing that serves the town and a passport is required if you travel over and want to get back in the USA. The only way to cross the border is to wade the Rio Grande River or hire a boat to take you across. Once you cross into Mexico it is still about a mile walk into town. Alternatively, you can pay for a mule ride or pickup truck ride into town.

The town has no external electric distribution system serving it. In 2015 the Mexican government funded the installation of solar power for the town and the electric lines to supply it to households and businesses in the town. The town has enough battery power to last two days without sunshine. But thanks to solar power, restaurants have refrigerators now and you can get cold cervezas.

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Every day we would stop by the Rio Grande Village Store to use the internet to check on Dad. We discovered a new feature on our phones that allow us to make phone calls over wifi. How cool is that!! Especially since in this part of the park there is no cell service. Each time we went to the store there would be a cluster of 5 to 10 people hanging around outside where the wifi signal was strongest. Invariably someone would ask us if we were getting a cell signal since they saw us talking on the cell phone.

Then on December 17th when we tried to make daily contact with Dad he wouldn’t answer the phone. We even tried calling Dads friend, Joe Farley, and he wouldn’t answer either. By now we were starting to get worried. Finally just after the noon hour, Joe called us to let us know Dad was back in the hospital.

EJ and I made a quick decision to leave 3 days early and head straight back to San Angelo. The cats settled in as we hit the road.

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By 6:45pm we were back at Rio Concho Manor in San Angelo, Texas hooked up to the power pole and on our way to see Dad at the hospital.

But, more on that next.



Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Public Lands

Northern New Mexico, 10-18-19

Who would want to camp like this…..

crowded RV Park

when there are so many better places to camp in your rig?

Back in August I talked about the trouble we had been having finding “good” places to boondock, or dry camp. Looking back over the summer and early fall our luck has improved. We’ve continued to explore and have found some wonderful places to settle for a few days or even a few weeks. As much as we hope to find that ideal boondocking or Public Land spot that is just off the paved road that no else knows about, they are either very rare or don’t exist.

Being realistic though, we like to find a spot with a view. Being surrounded by trees is nice, but after looking at tree trunks for a few days, they all begin to look the same and bring on a claustrophobic feeling as well. We like an open spot with mountains or water or some spectacular terrain in sight. Some of these are several miles from pavement and that means Miss Mosey is going to get dirty. But the views and solitude are worth it.

Gas pipeline right of way outside of Mancos, CO. National Forest dispersed camping.

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National Forest dispersed camping alongside the Dolores River between Rico and Telluride, CO.

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National Forest campground alongside the Rio Grande River

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Palisade NF campground near Wagon Wheel Gap, CO

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Mosca, CO Wildlife Management Area

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Highway Springs National Forest campground near South Fork, CO.

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Dispersed camping near Lizard Head Pass, CO.

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Not only do locations like these soothe our souls, but Gabby prefers them too.

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Noises in the bushes will keep her entranced for hours. But then after an afternoon of being in hunting mode, a nap is in order.

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We have to admit, Colorado is probably our favorite state for getting away from it all. There is so much wide open space and magnificent beauty. It’s  also a great place to indulge our hobby, Geocaching.  Below is EJ entering our geoname in a cache we found in the mountains.

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So long until next time!

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Arghh!! It’s open enrollment time again!

White Rock RV Park, White Rock, NM, 10-17-19

I am very proud of EJ today. It’s only been 2 days since open enrollment started (for us old folks on Medicare open enrollment ends December 7). She declared that we were gonna get this done and out of the way so we don’t have to worry about it any more. We are excellent procrastinators and waiting until the very end to accomplish something is not uncommon.

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One of the reasons for leading with the “Arghh” in the title is the mandate that we must carry Medicare Part D insurance for drugs or risk being monetarily penalized for the rest of our lives. Fortunately, EJ and I only have one prescription drug each that we require. And we can buy those drugs from Walmart with out using any insurance for far less than the price of the required policy.

And not only that, Humana sent us an email stating that if we wanted to keep our equivalent drug plan for 2020 it would cost each of us over an extra $30 a month. We prefer to stick with Humana because they are partnered with Walmart. And almost any where you go there is a Walmart nearby. Plus, it is so easy to transfer a prescription from one Walmart to another which is great for full time RVers.

So we started crunching numbers to try and understand which drug plan would be best and cheapest for us. Humanas’ price for a 2020 plan equivalent to what we have in 2019 is $58 per month. That’s $696 a year for each of us!! We can walk down to Walmart and buy four 90 day supplies for our prescriptions (with out insurance) for $40 per year each. That means we are throwing $656 down the drain.

Obviously we have to make a change. We can’t change the law and we don’t want to be penalized by opting out of the drug insurance plan all together. We continue digging and find that Humana has a “Walmart Value Rx plan for only $13.20 per month each. So instead of paying $696 for drugs that only cost us $40, we will pay $158.40 for those $40 worth of drugs, or a savings of $537.60 per year. It’s sad that we have to pay 4 times what the drugs actually cost, but in the end I guess we are subsidizing those in less fortunate circumstances.

For those interested, Walmart has a list of drugs and their prices for a 30 day and a 90 day supply is located HERE. Compare this to the price of your drug insurance, you might be surprised.

Next we tackled our supplemental health insurance. Since Medicare only covers 80% of your medical bill, we needed something to cover the other 20%.  We’ve been with Florida Blue since I turned 65 and they have worked out well for us as we travel. This year I have had more medical attention than I like, and no matter where we were, Florida Blue has handled it. So even though they raised their prices by about $15 a month we decided to stick with them for another year. We use their Plan F.

This all took the better part of the day. But it’s over with now for another year and kudos to my dear wife for making sure we did this instead of procrastinating.

Obligatory cat picture follows:

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Saturday, October 12, 2019

Miss Maggie Gives Us a Scare

Aspen Ridge RV Park, 9-27 to 10-1-19, South Fork, CO

Miss Maggie, as you may know, is our elder rescue cat. She joined our family in September of 2016 after we found her in a Priest River, Idaho animal shelter. We thought she looked so old and frail that she wouldn’t last through the winter. We decided that we wanted to make her last days as comfortable as possible so the decision was made to take her home with us.

Well, it wasn’t quite that straightforward as we Putnam’s never seem to make a snap decision about important things. We actually left her overnight while we talked about having her join our family. And it got cold that night so we worried about whether the shelter would keep her inside or would she be cold, would she make it and so on.

Three years later, she is still a part of our nomadic little group. Oh she still has her health problems that we deal with. In her previous life she had some trauma with her hips and now her mobility is limited. But she has learned that if she squawks loud enough we will help her up into a chair or down as the case may be. We travel with a ramp that we set up at the foot of our bed so she can walk up to go to sleep, or walk down for a late night snack.

She weighs about 5 pounds and never seems to gain any weight even though she has a voracious appetite. One of the medical problems she has is megacolon. This is a condition where the large intestine gets, well larger in diameter, and the bowel muscles get weak making it hard to go to the bathroom. The vet has prescribed lactulose which has really helped.

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Naturally when anything changes with her eating and bathroom habits we go on high alert. In the past, she has been to the vets several times to get, as we call it, “roto-rooted” to get her go to the bathroom( that’s Frank’s way of saying she received an enema) . This hasn’t happened in over two years so the Lactulose is working really well.

One day in late September she stopped eating altogether. She acted like she wanted to eat, but when she would get to her food bowl she would start making gagging noises. We tried all her favorite foods and got the same results.

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We steeled ourselves for the worst (thinking this may be the end) and made an appointment at the vet in Monte Vista, CO. This is the same vet office we took Gabby to a year ago when she had the “Gabby Bot” experience.

The vets there are kind and gentle and spend as much time with you as you want, while answering your questions and concerns. We insisted on all kinds of tests which all came back fine. There was no infection, her bloodwork was fine, all indications pointed to a healthy kitty. So why wouldn’t she eat. The vet ended up rehydrating Miss Maggie, and giving her an appetite enhancer. We asked for and received some special food that tasted extra delicious hoping that would help.

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After paying a hefty bill, we returned back to the RV and opened up a can of the special food. And she gobbled it up.

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The next day, I got the old off brand cat food (Paws) out of the refrigerator and put it in her bowl. When I set it on the floor she walked up to it and started gagging again, but didn’t eat any of it. I replaced it with some canned Friskies and she gobbled it down. Hmpf!! Could all of this been because of a can of “bad” cat food? The only difference is this time she only sniffed it and the previous time she actually ate it.

Life in Miss Mosey is back to normal again and so is Miss Maggie. Basking in the sun is always good.

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